How to Vote

During the election, each political party can put forward a candidate in every voting region (called ridings). You vote for the candidate you want. The candidate that gets the most votes becomes a member of parliament (MP). That MP represents the people in your riding. Traditionally, the party that gets the most MPs elected forms the government and the party with the next most MPs elected forms the official opposition.

Voting allows you to choose who you think will best represent you and your community. Your choice helps decide who will form the Canadian government.

CONTACT ELECTIONS CANADA
www.elections.ca
Toll-free 1-800-463-6868
TTY 1-800-361-8935
Hours of service:
Every day from 7:00 am to midnight (Eastern Time)

WHO CAN VOTE?

You can vote in this federal election if you:

  • are a Canadian citizen
  • are at least 18 years old on election day
  • can prove your identity and address
  • live in the riding where you are voting

HOW DO I REGISTER TO VOTE?

Register online
How: Use the Online Voter Registration Service before October 15, 2019
The only proof of name and address accepted for online registration is the number from your driver’s licence.

Register by mail
How: Request a registration form by calling your local Elections Canada office – get the phone number here.
Deadline: Mail back the form, with a copy of your proof of identity and address.
Proof of name and address: Include a photocopy/photocopies of your document(s). If some of the information appears on the back, photocopy both sides. They accept any document issued by a Canadian government that shows your photo, name and current address (e.g. driver’s licence), or two documents from the list of authorized documents (click to see the list). Both pieces must show your name and one must also show your current address.

Register in person at your local Elections Canada office
How: Visit your local Elections Canada office – get the address and hours here.
Proof of name and address: Choose one of the following options: Any document issued by a Canadian government that shows your photo, name and current address (e.g. driver’s licence), or two documents from the list of authorized documents (click to see the list). Both pieces must show your name and one must also show your current address, or an affidavit signed by you before a person authorized to receive oaths in the province or territory and showing your name and current address of ordinary residence, or if you cannot provide proof of your current address bring along a person who knows you and lives in the same polling division as you and proof of your identity. This person must prove their name and address using document(s) listed in option 1 or 2, above. To register this way, both you and this person must be present.

Register at your advance or election day polling place
It is possible to register at your polling place, just before you vote. But it is easier and faster when you register ahead of time.

WHERE DO I VOTE?

On election day you vote at a “polling station.” The address of the polling station will be sent to you in the mail along with your voters’ card. If you don’t get this information, call the Elections Canada office and ask them where you should vote.

POLITICAL PARTIES

In this election, people vote for the person they want to speak for them in the Canadian Parliament. This person usually belongs to a “political party.” A political party is an organization that has certain ideas about how to run the country. Every political party has a Leader, but the Leader’s name is not on the ballot. The ballot only has the name of the local person who is a candidate in your area and the name of the political party they are with.

There are many political parties registered in Canada, but only four of those parties run candidates in almost every riding. There are also many candidates running as an independent, which means they don’t belong to any political party. You can phone Elections Canada Toll-free 1-800-463-6868/ TTY 1-800-361-8935 or visit their website www.elections.ca to find out which parties have candidates in your riding. If you want to know more about the candidates who are running for election in your community, visit their websites, their campaign offices or go to an all candidates meeting.